Mid Autumn Report

It is the beginning of November and I have propelled myself into starting several schemes. I have made three Bat Boxes for outdoors, all with interior compartments. Our Pigsty is being converted into a wildlife friendly building, shelter for birds and beasts. (more of that in the next titbit).

Autumn brings long nights of full moons and insects attracted by artificial light. Enormous House Spiders fall into the bath and we start the delight of a regular evening open fire.

One outdoor plan is to cast stepping stones in concrete but I have got a bit distracted by  adding colour and texture to the mix and these twmps remain purely decorative.

September Report

2017 has seen a big increase in the number of butterflies in the cwm. The four pictured here are the Speckled Wood, Red Admiral, Tortoiseshell, and Comma. I am very ignorant about identifying moths and plan to learn more next year. The photo of the green "bridge" is I think, the Peppered Moth caterpillar. The chrysalis is that of the Elephant Hawk Moth pictured in the previous Titbit.

We have been transplanting birch trees this month and found the voracious, aggressive American Sawfly larvae stripping a sapling of leaves.

For four years now, to my delight, the lizards are still living in the sculpture titled "Wasp Loft".

September has been wet and cool, the streams are full and we have had plenty of big arching rainbows across the cwm. An annual prickly job is the pruning of the holly hedge which is eight foot across and eight feet high on one side. It adjoins the public footpath and takes the two of us two days to cut with shears.

Late August Creatures

Our last ever Art Trail is over and the near silence of unselfconscious life can happily settle back in the cwm. The Elephant Hawk Moth caterpillar is turning black as a sign of wanting to pupate. Its life of munching willow herb is over and next year it will become a pretty pink and green moth. Frog is poised on the edge of a bucket and the Palmate Newt is moving side to side over the surface of a cast iron bird. Fox is about to leap on something hidden in the grass. It turned out to be only three or four mouthfuls worth.

August Show

Maurice and Wendy are taking part in the Ceredigion Art Trail this summer!

We have made many interesting walkways across our meadows and through the woods. They display a wide diversity of habitats as well as numbers of sculptures.

We are open on August 12th,13th,16th,17th,19th,20th,22nd,23rd,24th,26th,27th,28th-10am-4pm

We look forward to seeing you all.

Spring Regulars

The ariel mounted on our chimney offers a commanding 360 degree view of the surrounding cwm. This spring it has been taken over by the usual pair of swallows and and for the second year running, a pair of mistle thrushes. They reared a pair of chicks in the same tree as last year.

The muggy weather brought out countless mayflies, and insect eating birds like the swallows and pied flycatchers had easy pickings. A regular pair of flycatchers nest in the studio wall and the tiny iridescent ruby tailed wasp is another local inhabitant of the stone work.

Further down the cwm in damp woodland, water avens carpets the ground and millions of tadpoles gather to sunbathe on the edge of the pond

Spring Flowers

Our cwm is vibrant with spring flower colour but I find taking photographs of them gets me no where near what they look like in their intense colour and delicate make up and shear quantity. Here are bluebells, a welsh poppy, stitchwort and aquilegia.

A Regular Nest Site

A pair of Blackbirds use a coil of barbed wire in an out house as the site of their nest.

They prefer this nest to be cleared away after use and they fly in fresh moss,grass and mud by the beak load.

March Sallow

This March has seen an abundance of the silky silver and yellow pollened catkins on the Pussy Willow trees. Happily differing hybrids of sallow have been displaying their male catkins over many weeks. I planted a twig in our cwm from a willow that used to put on a display as early as January during my childhood living in the Itchen Valley. Now we have a dozen of them lighting up the cwm from mid-winter through to the end of March.

February Fungi

Mid winter and the vegetation has died back. Fungi and Lichens stand out at this time of year in their multiple forms and textures. Here are photos of four- blue, yellow, red and transparent

Moon Photos

For a bit of fun after dark, when the moon and stars are visible, I point the camera at the moon and press the shutter open and wave the lens at the sky until the shutter closes or I choose to turn the camera off.

The resulting pictures are surprising.  If the stars are bright enough they will appear as finer repeats of the lunar pattern.

Sukkoth

After seven weeks work I have come to the end of making this piece and it is the most ambitious of my now, four constructions in oak. I hope to entice wrens, spotted fly catchers and bats into the roof area by building in cavities and shelves.

Hedgehog hotel

Now that the Woodland Trust owns more of the cwm, we are assured of more undergrowth and cover for wild life. At Blaen Cwm Cadifor the trees are tall enough to look after themselves and so we have let thickets of brambles,nettles and ferns form impenetrable areas,  allowing only small creatures to forage, like hedgehogs and woodcock. We are well on our way in the recycling of old fence posts and I have made the first Hedgehog Hotel, hopefully predator and water proof. 

Sunsets over Coed y Foel

With high pressure giving us settled weather, at around six thirty every evening we have been treated to a moving spectacle of colourful clouds. Sitting at "K2" with a drink and watching these sunsets has been a highlight of the autumn.

Being Maurice's jacket and a bat roost

 Maurice's jacket hangs in the workshop and I noticed on the floor directly underneath a build up of bat dropping. Carefully looking up into the denim garment we saw two young bats gripping the material near an armhole.

Inclination

Inclination is my latest sculpture, made with painted oak limbs collected from our nearby wood. The work contains fewer pieces of timber than previous sculptures, but seems to encompass more space.

Spider Webs

Many spiders sling their silk between separate spikelets which are to be found on rough vegetation. They spin delicate hammocks, veils, and spirals which remain invisible until coated by dew drops.

Four-spotted orb spider

I am putting up the next Rig amongst tall grasses in the Pond Field. There are thousands of veil webs and orb webs all around  but the nearest spider to me is a large female Four-spotted orb spider. She spends much of the time motionless, either digesting a meal or waiting for the next fly to get stuck on her sticky threads 

Muggy Weather

The air has been full of moisture and mist.  When ever the sun is out  flying ants lift off in clouds.

Angelica is a large plant that fills the meadows with white and pink umbrella flower heads. They have branching stems coloured deep purple.

Rigout

I  finished building Rigout this week. It stands in the centre of "Gwynfrudd Field", a circular, open area at the base of Coed y Foel. I have stained the oak limbs and the colours will alter with time and weather.